Making the Case

So you have a good idea for a new product and want to turn it into a successful business venture! That’s great, but now what?...

There is so much conflicting information out there, how do you know what to do next or where to begin? Should you hire a designer, an engineer, make prototypes, file a patent application since these may be needed at some point? What you should want to do is avoid making decisions prematurely that if done in the wrong order can jeopardize your project and cost you a lot of money. The fact is the failure rate for new products, invention launches, and patents that are not commercially viable is astronomically high. The good news is it doesn’t have to be this way. There is no reason your creative project is destined to become another statistic, not if you do your homework and build a firm foundation.

While it’s true that store shelves are full of products from companies with deep pockets, the fact is that inventors have some decided advantages...

The first advantage is having the vision to recognize the shortcomings in some of these products and the creativity to come up with solutions that will meet the needs of consumers. Another advantage is that inventors can respond more quickly than large companies that have schedules in place and a fixed number of products already in their development pipelines. If you pay attention to the details and make good choices, you have a chance to succeed regardless of the size of your war chest.

The Inventor’s Advantage

The Inventor’s Advantage

While it’s true that store shelves are full of products from companies with deep pockets, the fact is that inventors have some decided advantages...

The first advantage is having the vision to recognize the shortcomings in some of these products and the creativity to come up with solutions that will meet the needs of consumers. Another advantage is that inventors can respond more quickly than large companies that have schedules in place and a fixed number of products already in their development pipelines. If you pay attention to the details and make good choices, you have a chance to succeed regardless of the size of your war chest.

First Things First

Think of bringing your product to market as a two-phase process, one potentially cost prohibitive and one that is cost effective...

On the one hand, the product development phase, where any number of professional skillsets and deliverables are required, can be costly. On the other hand, the concept development phase can be completed through personal research, a few service providers and a limited budget. Since the majority of product ideas tend to get sidetracked by choices made early in development, the concept development phase is the best place to start. In this phase, your idea will be tested at each milestone to demonstrate whether it is viable and has a competitive advantage. Taking these initial steps will prove either that: a project is on the right track to advance to product development; that it needs to go back to the drawing board for revisions; or that this particular idea is not one of your best in which case you are now free to move on to another and better project.

This 8 Step (+) process has been developed and refined over decades of inventing and working with first time inventors...

It was designed to help make the idea-to-commercialization process more manageable and to preemptively arm the inventor against the minefields they could encounter. As a visual organization tool, the 8 Step (+) mind map is used to demonstrate: that decisions made at each action step can affect decisions for every other step; that each step may be as important to a project as any other; and that the focus must always be on validating the concept’s merits. These 8 steps may seem obvious as they are generic to virtually every product idea. However, it is only by looking beneath the surface, where the (+) enters in, asking better questions and activating your best problem solving techniques, that viable solutions can be found to crack your project’s invention code.

Cracking Your Invention Code

Cracking Your Invention Code

This 8 Step (+) process has been developed and refined over decades of inventing and working with first time inventors...

It was designed to help make the idea-to-commercialization process more manageable and to preemptively arm the inventor against the minefields they could encounter. As a visual organization tool, the 8 Step (+) mind map is used to demonstrate: that decisions made at each action step can affect decisions for every other step; that each step may be as important to a project as any other; and that the focus must always be on validating the concept’s merits. These 8 steps may seem obvious as they are generic to virtually every product idea. However, it is only by looking beneath the surface, where the (+) enters in, asking better questions and activating your best problem solving techniques, that viable solutions can be found to crack your project’s invention code.

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